Dragon Costume on the 3D Printer

First off, I want to give a shout out to Quintox303 on Thingiverse for their design. I had a work trip during the time I made this costume and didn’t have time to do the 3D model design of the dragon scales. Here are the scales I used:

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2779147

I decided I wanted to design a dragon costume after my boyfriend decided he wanted to be a knight for Halloween (dragon and dragon slayer… ha… ha…). A lot of things were easy to purchase, such as the tail and the wings, but I wanted to make my design a bit more unique and put my 3D printer to use. As some of you may have noticed, I took a hiatus from this blog due to a family illness. I won’t be as active on here due to this, but still want to make time for my hobbies and show them to you all.

I knew I wanted wrist and neck scales, so I began by designing a wristband that could use Quintox303’s scales. I modified them a bit so that weren’t as large and tall:

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I then purchased some tulle and got to work. I printed a few layers of the scales, then paused the print, carefully placed a layer of tulle, and continued to print:

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And voila, the finished print:

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Next was painting the scales to a color that would match my costume and imitate, well, dragon scales. I ended up using a layer of black spray paint, along with multicolored Spaz Stix spray paint:

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I purchased some gloves off Amazon, and using sewing, velco, super glue, and patience, fashioned a pair of dragon scale wristbands:

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(Yes, drinking was involved in the making of these wristbands lol)

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You can see some errors from this close up: some of the paint didn’t dry as I’d like, and some of the dragon scale points got pushed down, but I wasn’t too worried as this was a one night costume that I knew would probably get a little bit tossed around anyways.

Of course, between making my wristbands and my necklace, my front fan decided to die.

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Buh bye fan. I have had issues with this fan before, so wasn’t surprised by it dying on me. I didn’t want to risk printing without a fan, so I purchased a similar 12V fan online, spliced and soldered, and we were good to go (I’m making that sound much easier than it was… I’m no electrician). Anyways, I unfortunately did not take a lot of photos of the process of making the necklace, but it was very similar to how I made my wristbands, but using a small fabric necklace purchased from amazon as a backing (and of course the tulle and leftover fabric from my gloves). I also modified the scale 3D models even further to be smaller and flatter so that wouldn’t be so “jarring” on my neck:

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Alright, here are the final photos of the design! I hope you guys enjoyed, I had a lot of fun making this costume and even more fun wearing and being a dragon for the night ­čśÇIMG_1406.jpg

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Printing a Mount for the Oculus Rift

To start with:

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Secondly, this is what happens when you leave a print running and go to work:

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So maybe that doesn’t happen all the time, but I sure did waste a lot of wood filament. I was in the process of printing a wall mount for my Rift and touch controllers. I originally downloaded both models from Thingiverse, but I made some modifications to the mount for the HMD (scaled it along the X axis, added a curved surface since I’m constantly scared of UV light screwing up my lens):

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During the middle of the second try (this time with ABS), the extruder clogged. Lucky for me, I’ve dealt with that issue before (see my post about extruder clogs…) and was able to quickly disassemble the extruder, declog it, and reassemble. Hey, it only took a few hours rather than a few days! For my third try, I decided to just go with Prusa’s standard PLA:

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And the final products, mounted to the wall in all their glory:

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Yay for useful prints!

Experimenting with Wood Filament

I’ve always wanted test wood filament on my personal 3D printer; I had a chance in college to use it on the machines in fab shop and loved how it looked and felt. Most wood filaments are primarily PLA with some wood mixed in and the filament I decided to purchase was no exception. I went with Hatchbox, which is 80% PLA and 20% wood. Honestly, I would have guessed the wood percentage to be higher because the spool appeared/smelled like wood!

I was a bit nervous to load it in to my printer due to my printer’s history with clogs, so I researched the optimal settings online. Most people said to go with standard PLA settings, although some tried increasing both the nozzle and bed temperature slightly with decent results. Instead of 210 nozzle and 55 bed (standard PLA preheat settings on the Prusa), I bumped it up to 220 and 60. I cleared out the last bit of my clear ABS and loaded my wood filament- it took a bit longer to extrude and I had a minor heart attack during those first few minutes. But alas, it came through the nozzle in a clear and steady stream.

My first few trials fell short- I do recommend bumping the bed temperature up, potentially using a glue stick, and lowering the nozzle as I had initial difficulties with the filament refusing to stick. But once I got my settings jussstt right, I had absolutely beautiful results. Check out this gorgeous vase I printed (model here):

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After my first successful print, I decided I wanted to try post processing. I had watched youtube videos of people sanding and staining their models and was curious how well it worked. I purchased Minwax Polyshades Stain and Polyurethane in Antique Walnut and some high grit sandpaper and went to town:

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I was disappointed with how the vase turned out and do not have a final picture- the stain clumped and was not fully absorbed by the print. However, I had much better luck with a small frog I printed. Here it is pre-sand and stain:

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And here it is sanded and one layer of stain:

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The final product:

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Overall, it turned out very well! I felt like the most important part of the process was sanding the model down, as it seemed to help the stain absorb into the filament. I plan on continuing to test and will keep you all updated with new progress!

Documenting my Failures (and ultimate Success) with the Prusa Printer

As many of you know from my previous post, I left off discussing the misalignment of my Pinda Probe over the print bed. I wasn’t sure how big of an issue it was going to be, until I tried calibrating the XYZ axis. The nozzle began hitting the bed after the 3rd pinda position and I had to abort the calibration. I was pretty confused how to fix this problem and began digging around Prusa’s support site and different blogs/websites dedicated to Prusa printers. The most useful site I found was the Pinda misaligned page on the Prusa site. I determined my issue was shown in this diagram:

 

My Pinda had managed to front shift during the repairs of my extruder (see the post below for a rant of that godforsaken clog). The page said that to fix this problem, “just unscrew the M12 bolts holding it, move the Z-frame back (or front, depending of the position of the pinda relative to the heatbed probe circles, and tighten it back”.

Well, “just unscrewing the M12 bolts” turned out to be more difficult than I imagined. First of all, I didn’t put together the printer (yes, I’m one of those people who bought it pre-assembled) so I wasn’t quite sure where the M12s were located. I finally found this video by Josef Prusa which shows the exact location under the printer (around minute 8:00).

 

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After finding the bolts, I discovered that I probably needed to work out a bit more, as I could not loosen them. Even my boyfriend struggled and we sat for a while baffled at how we would possibly loosen them. FINALLY, with some help of WD-40, we were able to undo them. I realigned the Pinda within the circle and tightened the blots…. to only realize my Z frame was skewed. It took a couple tries, but I finally got it to sit perpendicular. Overall, it was a bit of a process, but the printer ended up calibrating fine (I’m still getting “XYZ┬ácalibration all right. X/Y axes are slightly skewed”, but that’s a fix for another day).

Here’s a pic of a quick test print, which I’m quite pleased with:

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I’ll post some more photos later of future prints, but in the mean time, happy printing!

Regarding my Prusa i3 MK2S

Hi all!

I apologize for the delayed post, for as you know, I have been quite busy with my new Prusa printer. It has been a bit of a rocky road to start, but I’m still really excited for what this printer has in store for me and all the great things I’ll print in the future! So I’m going to give a step-by-step of my first few weeks with it- hopefully this will give insight to other users on some common issues.

So here we go, the unboxing:

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This of course was so so exciting for me! I’ve loved 3D printing since college and always dreamed of having my own printer to meddle with. I decided to purchase the Prusa i3 MK2S assembled and received the printer quite quickly (I know Prusa Research just expanded their labs and therefore have faster turnaround time on their orders). Once I received the printer, I unboxed and began following the initial calibration tests. Check out these gummy bears hanging out with my newly unboxed printer:

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So here is where my issues begin. First issue was, as some of you may have guessed.. an extruder clog. To those of you who have never used a 3D printer, an extruder clog is one of the most common issues with 3D printers. A clog is never a quick or easy problem to resolve. I first noticed the clog when trying to load the filament for the very first time. I was quite frustrated, as I hadn’t even printed anything, but this ultimately became a very vital learning experience for me and I’m glad I had to go through it.

I tried both the the cold pull method and heat creep method (meaning I heated my nozzle to over about 230 Celsius to loosen any stuck PLA filament). Unfortunately, this did not remove the filament clog. Prusa provides an acupuncture needle you can insert into the nozzle to try and remove any stuck filament. Here you can see I ended up bending mine by pushing too hard on it:

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And here is how far I got my filament into the nozzle (you can see I’ve already begun taking apart the extruder… you’ll hear more about that loose fan in a moment):

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I decided to resort to both Google and Prusa customer service, since at this point I had no idea how to remove the clog. I found this article, whose author had a very similar clog to mine- he ended up taking apart his extruder. I was hesitant to do so, as I had purchased my printer assembled and had no background in the mechanics of the printer. However, Prusa customer service got back to me and said the same thing; I would have to take apart the extruder to clear the clog. They provided video instructions on how to disassemble the extruder, which helped me greatly and, yes, led to me removing the clog. Here are the links to those videos (1 and 2) if anyone else runs into a similar clog with their Prusa MK2S printer or E3D V6 hotend.

Firstly, it was really just unscrewing the motor, two fans, and housing, without damaging any of the wiring.

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After this is where it became more difficult. Essentially, after removing the housing, you are left with your nozzle (the tiny piece where your filament comes out), hot end (the box-like piece where all your wires connect and heat up- thus the name), and the heat break and heat sink (the pieces through which your filament travels to the hotend- there is typically also teflon tubing to help the filament flow correctly). See the below image as to what this all looks like:

I deduced that my filament was stuck in the heat break, as this is quite common and the location where my acupuncture needle got to. This meant I would have to disassemble everything further- I removed the heat break from the heat sink and then the heat break from the hotend (probably the most difficult part as it was screwed in factory tight- it helped to heat the hotend up a bit to loosen the pieces):

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And looked what popped out- that’s right, the clog! Sorry for potato quality, I was shaking from excitement:

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So there you have it, how to remove a clog from your extruder. This, of course, was not the end of my troubles as I had to reassemble everything. As soon as I began to reassemble, I realized that the wires from the cooling fan had broken off. I took this photo with just the black wire broken off, but as soon as I moved the fan, the red wire fell off as well:

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*SIGH* Out comes the soldering iron:

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Thankfully, soldering the wires worked and the fan powered up as I booted up the printer. And we are back in business!

Everything calibrated fine and I was able to begin printing.

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So exciting! Unfortunately, I do have to end the post with another issue… between the prints in the photo and now, my Z and Y axis became misaligned. The nozzle is hitting the bed every time I try to calibrate, and the PINDA is not aligned correctly (you can see it’s shifted forward, a bit outside of the white dashed circle):

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I’m hoping to get this fixed relatively quickly, and am cautiously optimistic due to my victory over the Battle of the Clog. WISH ME LUCK!

A big shout out to the customer service over at Prusa Research and to my boyfriend, who put up with my cursing and helped me unscrew the hotend/solder the fan!